All posts by Ramune Nagisetty

Densmore’s 2019 Kicks off with an Undeniable Hit

Sam Densmore’s new single “Damn the Consequences” puts him squarely in the genre of pop philosopher. The new single has sensibility of Elvis Costello, but with the rich instrumental layering of R.E.M., and a vocal timbre that sounds just a tad like a combination of Michael Stipe and Tom Petty. But the lyrics are what make this song really special. It’s a kind of coming of age song, a song with brilliant lyrics that shine with the wisdom gained from making it to middle age. He rhymes “love, like time, is a construct of the mind” in catchy and insightful opening lines. The chorus, “live like there’s no tomorrow,” and “damn the consequences, and regrets too” could be a calling to pursue the frivolous behavior of youth or to set out on a full on mid-life crisis.

Densmore released the song on Feb 27 with an entertaining video featuring Sam and a naked Portlander riding around town on scooters, which means that it must have been filmed last year when scooters were still legal in Portland.

Check out Sam’s discography, including his 2017 album, Open Marriage, which was also expertly written, on Bandbody typecbody typeamp and his website. Follow Sam on FB, and stayed tuned for his upcoming EP, Black Velvet Unicorn, to be released in the fall. His next gig are guaranteed to be awesome. April 13 he is playing a rare all-ages music video festival and concert alongside Skulldiver and Camp Crush at Clinton Street Theater. Congrats to Sam for kicking off 2019 with such a great single and amazing upcoming gigs!

Last but not least, if you’ve enjoyed this music review, please consider clicking on the sidebar to subscribe to the Portland Notes music blog so you can stay in tune with Portland’s amazing local music.

The Cabin Project’s Decenter is a Quiet Roar

The Cabin Project is one of Portland’s best bands, and if you haven’t heard of them yet, then get yourself to Bandcamp or your streaming service of choice and get listening. Their sound has evolved over five albums and could be described as ethereal folk or symphonic comfort music.

The new album, Decenter, which I’m guessing is a play on the word dissenter, consists of ten songs that are remarkably consistent with each other and with their previous 2016 release, Unfolded. The songs are layered compositions of soft falsetto vocals and light harmonies soaked in reverb and nested into the textures of violin strings and orchestral percussion. Characteristic to their style, many of their songs start with a delicate whisper, move into rolling polyrhythmic beats, and then crescendo in a quiet roar. The songs on this album were written in response to the current socio-political situation, though it’s hard to know that simply by listening to the lyrics. The band says “Given our political times and witnessing the exponential wrongs and beauties that people are capable of bestowing upon each other, we decided to make a record that was bold.” They further explain “We set out to make a record that represents who we are as musicians, as people, as fighters, as friends, as partners, as women, as queers, as outcasts, as people who hold privilege, and as humans who also exist in narratives outside the dominant. A piece of music that honors and holds space for all these stories.”

Check out their website, follow them on facebook, and keep an eye out for one of their stunning live performances. And if you’ve enjoyed this music review, please consider clicking on the sidebar to subscribe to the Portland Notes music blog so you can stay in tune with Portland’s amazing local music.

Pickathon Announces 2019 Lineup

This week Pickathon announced its initial lineup for the 2019 festival, to be held in the woods of Pendarvis Farm in Happy Valley, just outside of Portland, Oregon from August 2-4, 2019. Pickathon has built a reputation over the last twenty years as it has increasingly evolved its festival experience to include groundbreaking programming focused on discovery, sustainable ethics, and a lineup that pushes the boundaries of genre. This vision is clear in the diversity of Pickathon’s initial lineup, which brings together well-loved Americana, doom metal, North African desert blues, Congolese experimentalists, as well as local talent.

About Pickathon, Eric Johnson of Fruit Bats says “You’ll never see more musicians watching other musicians. I’ve always likened it to a dog park for bands. I love running around with the other pups at this thing. It creates a completely unique unfiltered atmosphere that anyone watching can feel, even if they can’t explain it.”

Start preparing for Pickathon now by listening to the Pickathon Spotify playlist and checking the Pickathon website for information and tickets.

Pickathon 2019 Lineup

Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats
Khruangbin
Mandolin Orange
Nathaniel Rateliff
Tyler Childers
Lucius
Preservation Hall Jazz Band
Fruit Bats
Mountain Man
Caamp
YOB
Damien Jurado
Lambchop
Laura Veirs
Julia Jacklin
The Marías
Miya Folick
Sudan Archives
Bonny Light Horseman
Mdou Moctar
Courtney Marie Andrews
Lido Pimienta
Cedric Burnside
Town Mountain
Jupiter & Okwess
The Beths
B Boys
Our Girl
JJUUJJUU
Sneaks
Young Jesus
Sam Evian
Black Belt Eagle Scout
Flasher
Mike and The Moonpies
Nap Eyes
Soft Kill
H.C. McEntire
Helena Deland
The Cordovas
Lauren Morrow
Bodega
David Nance Group
The Po’ Ramblin’ Boys
Virginia Wing
Garrett T Capps
Martha Scanlan
Gold Star
Colton Turner
&more (Chill Moody & Donn T)
David Bragger & Susan Platz

When We Met’s New Single and Music Video are Oh So Relatable

The dynamic duo, When We Met, has been playing in Portland for several years now, and is well-known for their high energy live set. The duo, consisting of Melissa Dorres on bass and vocals and Bryan Casey on guitar and vocals, cite influences as diverse as Cyndi Lauper, Devo, and Ween. Recently Dorres became Portland-famous with an in depth article called “Getting Bass-ic” in She Shreds magazine on all the things to consider when buying a bass guitar.

Photo Credit: Roderick Allen Photography

The duo released a brand spanking new single and music video on January 13. It’s the third cartoon-style video that they’ve done with cartoonist/director/actor Zachary Whitmore. Melissa explained that the song, Falling Apart, was “inspired by depression, the hopelessness and acceptance of it all.” She described the song as “an ode to social anxiety.”

The song starts with their characteristic guitar riffs, blissed out vocals, and the lyrics “I don’t know. I don’t care”. The following verses become more driving and the lyrics describe what it’s like to be a recluse and hiding from reality- “I just live my life. I don’t go outside.” Whitmore’s interpretation and cartoon skills are a highlight of this new must-watch music video.

When We Met’s next gig is at the Hawthorne Hideaway on Saturday March 9. Check out their website for more info and links to their albums and videos. If you’re still enjoying this music review, please consider clicking on the sidebar to listen to the Portland Notes on-line stream and subscribing to the Portland Notes music blog so you can stay in tune with Portland’s amazing local music.

Evan Knapp’s Musicianship Shines through in an Impressive Debut

Evan Knapp wrote most of the songs for Green, his debut record, when he was 18 or 19 years old. The whole album conveys precious innocence and a shared sense of nostalgia through Knapp’s well-crafted songs and impressive musicianship. Knapp is an astounding bass player who plays in several local acts. His R&B and jazz sensibilities come through in all dimensions of his songwriting, singing, and multi-instrumental playing. Knapp’s good friend and collaborator, Salvatore Manalo, brings a Latin jazz feel to Knapp’s grooves by adding guitar or keyboard playing on all the tunes.

In “Today” Evan sings with the smoothness of Dido and the swing of Sade, starting the song with a sweet croon “Baby. How’s your day been?” Knapp continues his smooth swing and creative rhymes in “House” with an earworm “you know I ain’t hard to satisfy.” “Windmill,” a jazzy track describing Knapp’s bike trip from Salt Lake City to Portland and a love that he can’t shake out of his mind, is only available on the CD and Bandcamp.

In my favorite tune on the album, “Frosted Flakes,” Knapp joins great songwriters in using a breakfast theme- but Jack Johnson’s Banana Pancakes has nothing on Evan Knapp. Frankly, Knapp could sing the phone book to this funky riff, but even better, he describes an entertaining perspective on getting repeatedly stood up by the girl of his dreams, talking himself back up with the lyrics “you are what you eat, so enjoy them frosted flakes.”

“Take Your Time” has a funky vibe with an affirming message for those who are impatient to get to where they want to be “Take your time. Your opportunity will arise.” “Matter of Thought” describes the beginning of his journey westward and ends with Knapp saying to himself “what you’re doing with your life ain’t enough.”

It’s worth adding that Evan is a remarkably considerate person. I guess this is what might happen when someone grows up working on their parents’ organic farm and living abroad as an exchange student. When I first met Evan he was checking out all sorts of bands and venues, getting to know local musicians and their music. He supports other artists by playing in their bands and attending a lot of gigs. He has become woven into the fabric of the music community. His immense talent and supportive attitude make him one of Portland’s shining stars.

Get to know more about Evan through his brand spanking new documentary video on the making of the EP.

Check out Evan’s website, which includes links to all the major streaming services. The next opportunity to hear him play live will be on February 6th at Kelly’s Olympian with Sweet N’ Juicy and There Is No Mountain. And if you’re still enjoying this music review, please consider clicking on the sidebar to listen to the Portland Notes on-line stream and subscribing to the Portland Notes music blog so you can stay in tune with Portland’s amazing local music.