Baker’s Dozen Coffee Beer and Doughnut festival March 12 – you Dough Nut want to miss it!

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Brian Yaeger, organizer of the Second Annual Baker’s Dozen, was kind enough to explain the inspiration behind this unique event – we hope to see you all at Culmination Brewing Co. (2117 NE Oregon St) on Saturday, March 12! The fest begins Saturday, March 12, 10 a.m. and goes until 3 p.m. Tickets are limited to 400 (to ensure attendees can sample everything) and are available for $24 ($27 at the door) at http://Merctickets.com/go/BakersDozenPDX

Brian-Yaeger-Article-01Paid admission includes a 4-ounce sample of every unique coffee-infused beer and every delectable doughnut morsel (most will be quartered). Additional items will be available for purchase, including additional beer by the glass. For folks needing savory protein, Culmination Kitchen executive chef Carter B. Owen will have breakfast sandwiches available for sale and several of the roasters will provide complimentary joe.

As an all-ages event, festival-organizers are introducing the Doughnut Decoration Station courtesy of “Double D,” Delicious Donuts (whose apple fritter will be included with each ticket). Cake doughnuts will be available for purchase for young ones and less-young; all proceeds will go to Friends of the Children, Portland providing commitment assistance to at-risk youth.

Because this event is so different from anything I’ve experienced in Portland, I had a few questions for Brian.

The 13th doughnut…?

The 13th doughnut this year is actually something I dreamt up last year: The world’s first collaboration doughnut. We’ve seen this among breweries a ton: 2 or more brewers put theirs heads together to come up with a new beer. So stay tuned for the collaborative efforts of doughnut makers to debut at the fest!

I’ve often paired coffee and doughnuts, but never coffee beer and doughnuts…can you explain the inspiration behind this festival?

Coffee and doughnuts are a natural. They’re the most perfect symbiotic relationship in the food and beverage world. Maybe it’s the Strange Brew fan in me, but I’ve always loved the marriage of beer and doughnuts, too. But not every beer goes with any doughnut. To make this work, the magical addition of coffee into the beer means there’s a strong likelihood of discovering your new favorite pairing at the fest.

What exactly is a coffee beer, if you can explain it?

Brian-Yaeger-Article-02For years and years, “coffee beer” meant one of only two things: a coffee porter or a coffee stout, and even there there’s not much difference since you’re taking a dark, roasty beer with naturally occurring coffee notes from the roasted barley and complementing it with actual coffee. Those were and remain delicious. But nowadays we’re seeing myriad beer styles accented with coffee beans or cold brew. This year’s line-up includes base styles like stouts, of course, as well as a brown ale, a pale and an IPA and, to push the envelope even further, a mead. I can’t wait to try that blend of fermented honey and cold brewed joe!

You have written a great deal about beer – what is the attraction for you?

Wow, that IS the question isn’t it? I can ramble on about this for ages! But I won’t. Essentially, I’ve always written about artists, probably because I’m not a great one so I support the community by writing about it. Once I started looking at beer as an art form, the shift in my writing was pretty swift. It’s a fascinating world and I really enjoy exploring the characters in the industry, the trends, the places our delicious beers hail from, and the never-ending possibilities of what beer can be and who can dream it all up. Incidentally, before I ever profiled a single brewer, I’d written a story about the doughnut maker whose creations I grew up devouring. I’ve interviewed hundreds of brewers at this point, but that baker goes down as one of my all-time favorite interviews.

This festival hosts a number of culinary artisans – how do you select the participants?

Brian-Yaeger-Article-03It’s a little known fact that there are as many roasters as there are brewers in Portland. By doing Baker’s Dozen annually, I hope to be able to tap a coffee beer from each and every great brewery as well as incorporate beans from every worthy roastery. But bringing together 60-70 coffee beers is just too dang much. So I immediately knew I wanted to call this festival Baker’s Dozen and therefore select 13 artisans from each field: beer, coffee, and doughnuts. As for the selection process for breweries, I strived for a range of newer and more established breweries. For the roasters, I encourage partnerships based on proximity to the roastery/brewery. And for doughnuts, it’s a testament to Portland’s love of these typically hole-y delicacies that there are double-digits to choose from. Some brands are known to everyone in town and deserve their followings. Some are less-known but equally fantastic. As one example, most people don’t know of Rocking Frog Cafe on SE Belmont let alone that they make doughnuts made to order. No display case! No bonkers toppings. Just fresh, piping hot ‘nuts you have to wait a few minutes for after you order them. So, how do I select the participants? I invite the ones I love patronizing the most and then start thinking about who to invite the next year.

You host a number of events – what else are you working on right now?

Brian-Yaeger-Article-04Other than Baker’s Dozen, my main beer event I’m working on is called Kriekfest. Krieks are sour cherry beers from Belgium, but of course they have caught on in America. When I was at Solera Brewing in Parkdale halfway up Mt. Hood from Hood River, which is surrounded by cherry orchards, I instantly knew they had to host a beer fest dedicated to these beers. And to ensure that happened, I organized it. That will be July 9. And yes, I’ve already put some brewers on the case for Kriekfest 2017. Beyond this, I’ve done some smaller events like “Rural Brewer,” a play on the 30 Rock running joke about a play called the Rural Juror. I brought together many of Oregon’s most remote breweries. I did Glühbier–a night of all hot, spiced beers–because that’s actually A Thing in European Christmas Markets that I couldn’t believe hadn’t made it’s way to Portland, so look for that to return to Bazi Bierbrasserie next December. I definitely have a few more I’m fleshing out I’d love to discuss down the road:-)

Here are some photos.

Local Youth In Music – John Guffey from School of Rock

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First of all, we would like to thank School of Rock Portland for joining Portland Notes to present a Local Youth Music Showcase this April 9. Along with McMenamins White Eagle Saloon, we are inviting 6 local youth bands to share their covers and original music with Portland, in hopes of expanding opportunities for all student based bands to play and see live music. School of Rock has, of course, always been a strong voice on behalf of young musicians – so naturally, we wanted to find out what motivates such an organization.

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I think that this conversation with John Guffey from School of Rock might just explain everything…Guffey is the Director of Franchise Operations for the International music school program, which teaches kids to “rock on stage and in life.” His job consists of traveling from school to school, training managers and instructors how to make the best use of School of Rock’s proven teaching methods, how to nurture their students’ interest and skill in music, and how to best encourage parents to participate in their children’s music education. He’s a very busy man, but we managed to catch him in between his travels to ask him about his personal journey with music, School of Rock, and the students he’s taught and mentored.

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Like most adults who spend any time at a School of Rock, I immediately said, “I wish there had been something like this when I was a child!” Imagine – a place where a child can sit down with an instructor and learn how to play songs they listen to at home, practice in the lesson and at home, and then come together with other students to play the songs as a group. Rehearsals every week, and then a real rock show performance at an actual music venue in their town – on stage rock star status, screaming fans and all! The best way to learn music is to play music, and the most fun way is to play it with other music fans. It’s a great way to learn about music, but also a rewarding way to learn cooperation, teamwork, encouragement, and accountability.

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Providing an easily accessible way for students to study and create music opens their minds and hearts to more than just notes on a page. Music is an escape for some, a way to communicate, to find like-minded creative friends, and to express emotions that are sometimes difficult to put into words. School of Rock is a place where close, long-term friendships are formed over a common love of music. All of these sentiments are reflected in Guffey’s story. From the story of how he was introduced to music, to his career path with School of Rock, Guffey’s life is an example of how using music as communication and common ground has propelled his success and satisfaction.

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Guffey is a strong supporter of local bands – he mentioned a few, and led us to several others. Ape Cave, Chronological Injustice, Saola, Dad Rock, New Social Outcasts, and Red Fox all have current or former School of Rock student band members. The April 9 lineup at McMenamins includes Jack Mortensen Music, Michael Hermes, 4 Day Moon, Black Sand, and Pedestrian Death Gang – along with the School of Rock House Band. There is so much talent among these bands. Finding places to play is a challenge – finding places to play where their underage friends can see them is nearly impossible. Thanks to McMenamins White Eagle Saloon for being willing to take a chance on April 9! And again, a giant thank you to the parents and Portland School of Rock for being huge supporters, and helping to actually form the featured bands through years of investment in their musical education!

Jackalope Saints at Grand Lodge on 02-27-16

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Jackalope Saints describe their sound as “folk music fashioned to bluegrass and hammered to the floorboards of forgotten barns, winding through overgrown valleys where ailing giants sleep their lives away”. They played McMenamin’s Grand Lodge Saturday night with the full band, less the drummer who sprained his foot the day before.

Jackalope-Saints-at-Grand-Lodge-on-02-27-16-01The amazing thing about this band is the wide variety of sounds they can produce. In their musicial arsenal they have an acoustic guitar, electric guitar, bass guitar, drums, harmonica, mandolin, banjo, violin and trumpet. (In fact, with the use of the trumpet, I also heard a definate latin feel to some of their songs.) This variety of sounds takes us to their name. According to legend, the mythical jackalope (looking like a jack rabbit with antelope horns) can mimic any sound. Given enough time, I believe these guys could too.

Jacob Westfall at McMenamins Kennedy School on 02-25-16

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Portland Notes stopped by McMenamins Kennedy School last night to catch Jacob Westfall‘s “Be Right Back” show. ​This is his last Portland show for a few months because he’s taking off for Nashville to hone his craft, do some networking, and see what’s next.

Jacob is a young man who seems much older and wiser than his chronological age, with a music background that started at the age of 7 when he began playing the piano influenced by his older sister’s music tastes. Actually, the entire Westfall family has varying degrees of musicality, and his father still plays guitar every day at home.

Jacob-Westfall-at-McMenamins-Kennedy-School-on-02-25-16-01Describing his music, Jacob says, “My music is a conversation with the audience—like I’m telling them a story.” He counts Ben Folds as one of his greatest influences and spent many an hour studying Folds’ albums and songwriting style. His soulful vocals have been compared to singers like Jeff Buckley and Sam Smith but with the character and songwriting style of John Mayer. With “more than a nod to Ed Sheeran,” Jacob’s solo performance is “animated by astute guitar and kinetic live looping.”

Jacob-Westfall-at-McMenamins-Kennedy-School-on-02-25-16-02Jacob’s musical talents are many. At 9, he wrote his first song, “Midnight Bloom,” about watching the Leonid Showers with his Mom, thinking that the stars looked like flowers. In 6th grade, he took up the sax, Grades 9 -11, trying to meet girls; he picked up the drums and bass guitar, and at 17, began playing guitar. It was at this time that his father gave him his prized Takamine which he plays to this day,

Jacob-Westfall-at-McMenamins-Kennedy-School-on-02-25-16-05Haley Johnsen, playing a solo acoustic set, opened the show. Family obligations prevented hearing her entire set, but having seen her many times, she put on a great show that was appreciated by the crowded room, and led to many album sales. Her lyrics speak of love found and love lost, feeling and overcoming pain, suffering and triumph. Haley was featured on American Idol in 2012, finishing in the top 24. After touring and coming home to perform locally, she gives back to the community by offering vocal and guitar lessons to children at the Lake Oswego School of Rock. Much like Jacob, she is in a transitionary stage, with open arms to receive that next direction for her music, while continuing to perform, and perfect her craft.

Jacob-Westfall-at-McMenamins-Kennedy-School-on-02-25-16-04Jacob played as a four piece band, joking that members; Dylan Sundstrom, Andrew Magnuson, and Mark Muusse are available for hire. He started off his set with “What If,” the title track off his latest album. His setlist included original material sprinkled with a few popular covers. His music touches on relationships gone bad, the need for love in this political climate, to an angry response to Kesha’s current trial against Dr. Luke in a #FreeKesha song. Playing many few favorites, “Second Chances,” a song that speaks to a romance, but could actually apply to getting a second chance at most anything in life, and the beautiful and heartfelt, “Lonely,” written for his lovely lady. Addressing a time when he was bullied as a child, is the anthemic, “Movin On.” With Andrew on Mandolin, and Dylan on upright Bass, the three performed a beautiful rendition of Lorde’s, “Royals.” Bringing Haley back onstage, the two of them performed a moving version of Elvis’, “Fools Rush In”, with the band joining them for the final chorus. This was the perfect song to end the set, but like all shows, the audience demanded an encore, so the finale was a rousing, “Blister in the Sun” by the Violent Femmes.

Jacob-Westfall-at-McMenamins-Kennedy-School-on-02-25-16-03In a recent conversation with Jacob, he reminisced about a time when his Dad told him that the latin roots of the word, enthusiasm, are God In Us, Jacob believes that no matter what “God” is to you, if you live your life with enthusiasm, you are going to be happy, and he strives to do just that. When you see a Jacob Westfall performance, you will get enthusiasm, passion, and honesty, along with a connection between this talented musician and his audience. He may be a young man, but he is an old soul in his convictions and talents. Portland wishes him a fond farewell, for now, because he will be back, and we will await his return with baited breath!

Size 85 High Tops – Fusion in many forms!

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Those of you who know me know that I have a passion for youth and music – put them together, and you have my attention! Thank you to Alex Steininger of In Music We Trust PR for bringing Size 85 High Tops to my attention! This youth-inspired and co-fronted band blew me away with the perfectly timed and blended vocals, original lyrics, variety, and precision production! Because their next show is an album release, Portland Notes wanted to just get the word out – Size 85 High Tops ROCK and will release their album Get Loose at a concert at McMenamins White Eagle Friday 2/26. I cannot wait to get them in for an interview, but until then I’d like to share a bit about them from their biography and album release notes. This father/daughter-led band is an inspiration to me, as it shows a multi-generational investment in the creative process.

The following bio segments are taken verbatim from the band’s Facebook and record release press kit: music is available on Bandcamp.

Size 85 High Tops are an art-rock band from Portland, OR led by daughter-father duo Myra and Jesse Keyes; together with multi-instrumentalist Scott Van Schoick, the High Tops play and record in various combinations with contributions from Joel Bocek (Bubble Cats), Paul Brainard (Richmond Fontaine), Kyleen King (Heartless Bastards), David Gerow (Sneakin’ Out), Victor Nash (Point Juncture, WA), and Jenny Conlee (the Decemberists), among many others. Their music is a fusion of forms: classic rock, power pop, folk, jazz, prog, and country merge with grunge, neo-psychedelia, and an imaginative style of songwriting to yield a vibrant modern Northwest sound.

“I write a lot of the time with her in mind. She gives me unlimited options and I’ll use her to sing a line I might initially hear played on guitar, horn, strings, whatever,” says Jesse Keyes about his ten year old daughter, Myra Keyes. “And she loves being in the band, frankly. We wouldn’t include her if she wasn’t having a ball. She named us, it’s her band, and she’s the muse.”

Jesse Keyes is the songwriter for Portland, Oregon-based Size 85 High Tops, which he fronts with his daughter.

“She’s such a big part of the whole thing organically that it was a no-brainer,” he says of adding Myra to the band. “She’s the reason I’m even back in music again at all. I was more or less content to work my job and hammer away at unpublished novels all those years until she came along and started singing like that.”

The result is Size 85 High Tops’ second album, Get Lose, a fourteen track collection of songs that span the gamut and vibrantly meld classic rock, power-pop, psych-folk, prog, and country into a sound the band has dubbed “Hightopsian.”

Keyes, who was born and bred in rural, small-town Wisconsin, moved to Portland with his prolific, yet short-lived obscure art-rock band Pan, which quickly dissolved. He then soon found himself married and returning to college to focus on his technical writing, leaving music behind.

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Soon thereafter he began digging ditches and decommissioning oil tanks to supplement the family income. Then, following a ten year hiatus from music, over a long run of hard labor, Keyes met artist and multi-instrumentalist Scott Van Schoick and the two become fast friends, sharing a love of music history and an affinity for their Midwestern heritage as well as for the possibilities of a new-old kind of music in the Northwest.

“So I started buying vinyl again and discovering, with Myra this time, a lot of music I had missed the first time around. We listened to a lot of Wings, Carpenters, Lovin’ Spoonful, Beach Boys, Beatles, Cat Stevens, Mamas and Papas, Donovan – stuff that kids naturally gravitate toward because it’s playful and innocent and melodic and creative and colorful and often very sophisticated,” Keyes says of his return to music. “One thing led to another and pretty soon I was buying a cheap guitar again and starting over. Because she was so much fun to sing with. She had a knack and a love for music and she was just so inspiring.”

Size 85 High Tops released their debut, a self-titled covers album in 2012 for family and friends. But, before that project was even wrapped up, Keyes was well into writing songs for what would become Get Loose.

“The old songwriting bug had been zapped alive again,” he laughs. The result was Keyes had written two double albums and had music for two more albums as well.

With Van Schoick’s knack for arrangement and production, along with his skills on the drums, piano, and trombone, Keyes, Myra, and Van Schoick entered Victor Nash’s studio in early 2014 to begin recording Get Loose, enlisting the help of local musical heavyweights such as Paul Brainard (Richmond Fontaine), Kyleen King (Swansea, My Morning Jacket, Heartless Bastards), Joel Bocek (Bubble Cats), Jenny Conlee (The Decemberists), and David Gerow (Sneakin’ Out), among many others, to flesh out Keyes’ songs.

Of the studio experience, Keyes says that the record came out exactly how he heard it in his head. The highlights for him, without hesitation, is every song.

“Every song seems to have its own little transcendent moment – some are a bit more dramatic and others are subtle, but I guess those for me are highlights. There are also very clever piano phrasings – often just two or three notes, but they’re the right notes – all over the album. Little instants that make me remember all the work that went into certain transitions and sections that were tricky to develop. I like what we achieved vocally on ‘Hills.’ The macabre organ coming after the bridge on ‘Grackles.’ Very visual, evocative moments for me. Myra’s ‘alive’ vocal in ‘Laid.’ Kyleen’s incredible tone on ‘Madrona.’ Joel’s melancholic guitar on ‘Store.’ Other things that make me smile and remember laughing in the studio. Victor and Scotty and I shared a lot of laughs. God we laughed.”

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Awestruck by all the players and their performances, Keyes says he’s very proud of Get Loose and happy the way everything turned out.

“It speaks to the players and to our engineer that they could read the material so well and bring the final realization so close to our vision. In some ways it shattered my expectations and in many ways it really did just nail it. I recorded a little demo on my eight-track with guitar and vocals that I gave to everyone before rehearsals, and listening back you can hear all the potentialities and ways for the songs to go – an infinite number of directions and possibilities, really. But I always feel like there’s one optimum way, and if you can find the trail and keep your balance, you only follow a song to its logical conclusion. That goes for both writing and recording. It’s very intuitive and you shouldn’t over-think it.”

He continues, “One of our mottos was ‘new songs, old sounds,’ so we used a lot of vintage amps and pedals and old phasers, lots of verb. ‘Space and grit’ was another one. I think it’s a good guitar album because of Joel’s playing and because of the variety of acoustic sounds we were able to dial up. You’d think I was playing a bunch of different high-end guitars but it’s just my cheap old Epiphone jumbo with strings that should’ve been changed years ago. People get so caught up on gear and sound that they lose sight of what matters: good songs and good playing.”

That is exactly what you’ll find on Get Loose, a tight collection of fourteen songs that vary in style and sound, all woven together with common patterns and textures.

“It’s an album born out of life, loss, land, work, and family. Mostly it’s a love letter to my girls,” admits Keyes. “It’s emotional and confessional and there was an explicit attempt to get the best artistically out of my own synesthesia – to build an album of songs in all twelve keys corresponding individually to colors, and then to manipulate that color wheel in a way that might produce a rich and satisfying listening experience: to essentially ‘paint’ an album.”

Upcoming Shows:
Friday, Feb 26, White Eagle (album release)
Saturday, Mar 12, Analog Cafe (all-ages)
Wednesday, Apr 20, Panic Room

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