Laryssa Birdseye Finds Common Ground and Unites Us in a Song

Laryssa Birdseye is unstoppable. In September she released “So What?”, her brilliant debut full length album. In December two days before Christmas she released an inspired new song, “Can’t Cry on Christmas”, and music video. Then on Feb 14 she released another new song and music video, “Save Us From Us.” It was an unplanned coincidence that “Save Us From Us” was released on the same day as the Parkland, Florida school shooting. She had actually written the song more than a year prior, as a response to the 2016 election, and had planned to release the video as a Valentine’s Day love song to all of us. The song and music video have ended up being symbolic as the whole country mourns the loss of 17 people and engages in a debate over the right to own automatic rifles. Great art reflects the world we live in, as this song does.

Link to video

Laryssa’s lyrics and her own thoughtful description of the song best convey what this song is about and what it means to her.

The world looks darker today, what a strange sky.
It’s nothing we’ve not seen before, another day another headline
So listen up now, and hear who’s to blame, or who to fear, or who to kill, or who to hate this time around, and we grow full on information. Lies are tainted, laced with malice and we’ve fallen to the ground. We’ve fallen down.
So where do we go from here? How do we change?
In a heart filled with fear, what still remains?
Maybe I’m not sure right now. Maybe it’s enough.
Maybe it’s cliche to say, but maybe it could be love.
Maybe it could save us from us.
Give a man a dollar
Give another man a billion
Teach a man to be a scholar
Teach another man to kill, and
We end up with a mess that we cannot contain
We’ve been tricked into thinking we are not the same
So where do we go from here? How do we change?
In a heart filled with fear, what still remains?
Maybe I’m not sure right now. Maybe it’s enough.
Maybe it’s cliche to say, but maybe it could be love.
Maybe it could save us from us.
You are not my enemy
You are not my enemy
You are not my enemy
And I am not yours
Maybe I’m not sure right now. Maybe it’s enough.
Maybe it’s cliche to say, but maybe it could be love.
Maybe I’m not sure right now. Maybe it’s enough.
Maybe it’s cliche to say, but maybe it could be love.
Maybe it could save us from us
From us, from us, from us
Save us from us
Save us from us

“I wrote Save Us From Us around January of 2017. After the stress and fatigue of a long election year gone terribly awry (or perfectly predictably, depending on who you asked), I was tired. It seemed like every day you heard a story of another person of color gunned down in the streets by the police, another muslim immigrant getting beaten or bullied because of their culture and religion, or another woman having to fight her hardest to bring her rapist/abuser to justice, all while getting torn down in the public eye for being too flirtatious, too drunk, too anything. It also seemed like the place I lived in, this political bubble that Portland can often be, was truly not immune to what the rest of the country was experiencing. I began to realize that Portland is not the haven that I had once thought it was. This country has some real issues. If one group does not have justice, then none of us have justice, none of us have peace. I began writing this song as something more politically overt, I wanted to truly rage against what I thought was unjust, but then something happened. I had felt so hopeless about the world, about the situation we have found ourselves in, that I realized I could not contribute more to that message. The chorus just came out of me, in a shy way, as I realized that I am truly hopeful about the future. Is love the answer to all of our problems? Not in any practical sense of how to fix racial/gender/socioeconomic disparities in this country. I truly think it’s about redistribution of wealth and radical reform in our education system so we know what this country was founded on. Not this narrative we get served in public school, but the REAL history of this nation. We have to rip the bandaid off and look deep at that wound in order to figure out how to heal it. But I do think that radical love, radical understanding and radical compassion is necessary in order to bridge these gaps that divide us. I understand my place in this country as a white woman; that I benefit from many privileges given to me merely by my skin color. I want so much to spend my life using that privilege for good, in any meaningful way possible. It is my aspiration as a songwriter, as a musician, and as a person to speak out about injustice, to be the best ally that I can be, and to listen. I think, at the very essence of it, we are all people that want love, that want to be understood, and that want to be safe. That is what unites us. It is up to all of us to ensure that we are all given the same opportunities, that we fight for what is right, and not to react, or hate out of fear. Fear divides. Love unites. I know it all sounds cliche in a song, but that’s all I have figured out at this point.” -Laryssa Birdseye

Catch Laryssa’s residency at Al’s Den during the week of March 4-10 and at the Old Church on March 15. She is amazing to hear live and makes the world a better place. Keep up with her upcoming events on fb and her website.

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